More boobs please.

The participatory culture of today allows citizens more freedoms to create a powerful message and the evolution of convergence has made it easier than ever before to say what we want, to who we want and even having the capacity to remain anonymous. With this freedom though there comes a downside of an online world filled with negativity and hate…

http://www.androidpolice.com/2013/06/04/president-obama-proposes-patent-troll-laws-that-will-probably-do-very-little-to-stop-most-patent-trolling/
http://www.androidpolice.com/2013/06/04/president-obama-proposes-patent-troll-laws-that-will-probably-do-very-little-to-stop-most-patent-trolling/

In 2012, over 85% of people said that they had witnessed some form of online bullying and one of the most prominent forms of online mistreatment is that of misogyny and sexism. Online trolling is as old as the first forms of social media and it refers to the posting of harmful and derogatory comments in order to acquire an emotional response from the victim. Sometimes they are funny and meant in jest whilst other times the boundaries are pushed too far and sometimes end in death. Often these people troll the internet under aliases or anonymous accounts and this means they are hard to find, report and punish.

Many modern day women are taking advantage of the internet, allowing them to speak their minds and have begun posting on all issues current to themselves and the world. This is when trolls attack, they use gender, sexual innuendoes, fashion and all sort of other irrelevant comments to demoralise and insult the minority groups to feel a sense of self-empowerment and superiority. This has been the case for Alanah Pearce, a videogame journalist who makes regular videos for numerous YouTube channels. She has been faced with much sexism on her social networking sites and her professional websites with most hateful comments not at all related to her content.

http://www.kotaku.com.au/2013/04/30-days-of-sexism/
http://www.kotaku.com.au/2013/04/30-days-of-sexism/

Everyone is technically entitled to their own opinion so it has proven difficult to address rules and guidelines regarding people’s voices being heard online but to what extent should we allow this to continue and when will it go far enough that action will be done?

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